Neoreaction

Neoreaction is a political worldview and intellectual movement based largely on the ideas of Mencius Moldbug. Neoreactionary thought can be roughly broken into three major areas:

Worldview

Modern history is an epic tale of social decay under chronically bad government, masked by increasing technological wealth. The dominant liberal-progressive ideology is badly out of touch with reality, and actively destructive to civilization.

Our society's elite factions are coordinated enough to distort public knowledge of society to neutralize threats to their power, but not enough to rule efficiently and responsibly. Traditional and organic modes of sociopolitical organization could remedy our problems, but we are held back by this weaponized self-conception and lack of competent authority.

Restoration Program

The core of our problem is that there is no one with the secure authority to fix things. The core of our solution is to find a man, and put him in charge, with a real chain of command, and a clear ownership structure.

Real leadership would undertake a proper corporate restructuring of USG: Pardon and retire all employees of the old regime; regularize international relations as explicitly either imperial or non-interventionist; nationalize and restructure the banks, media, and universities; and begin the long slow process of organic cultural recovery from centuries of dysfunction.

Passivist Strategy

American liberalism is an unsustainable mess. Everyone knows it, but no one will admit it until someone builds a concrete superior alternative.

Anything but patient work on a worthy new system is a harmful distraction. Rebellion, violence, and activism just create more chaos, and don't get us any closer to restoration.

The only viable path to restoration of competent government is the simple and hard way:

  1. Become worthy.
  2. Accept power.
  3. Rule.

Reading

Understanding Neoreaction requires substantial background reading, and has produced some indispensible work of its own. It cannot be understood without familiarity with these works:

Books and Essays

Background works that have strongly informed our view of the world:

The Latter Day Pamphlets, by Thomas Carlyle.

The Bow of Ulysses, by James Anthony Froude.

Popular Government, by Henry Sumner Maine.

On Power, by Bertrand de Jouvenel.

Liberty or Equality, by Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn.

Democracy, the God that Failed, by Hans-Hermann Hoppe.

The Use of Knowledge in Society, by Friedrich Hayek.

The Integration of Theory and Practice, by Eric Heubeck.

Neoreactionary Work

Unqualified Reservations, by Mencius Moldbug.

Radish Magazine, by Karl F Boetel.

Best of Neoreaction, by the Neoreactionary Community.

Liberty Files, by James Donald.